Town of Ludlow

Town of Ludlow

The October Country Inn has long been a favorite for visiting cyclists.  The 20 Mile Stream Road loop is a Vermont bike ride of modest length.   It starts with a long gentle downhill section.  It adds a quiet, slow (mostly uphill) ride along an idyllic country backroad.  And then finishes with a breezy, brake lever clutching downhill. The ride starts out though a lake front residential section along a scenic state highway.  It goes through the towns of Ludlow, and Cavendish before you turn off the highway.  Your thoughts and concern dim as you become one with Vermont’s bucolic splendor.  If you want to extend the ride, start and end this ride at the October Country Inn for a total of 44.3 miles.

Cyclists love a Vermont bike ride.

20 Mile Stream Road

20 Mile Stream Road

For the 20 mile option, park at the Tyson Church parking lot off Route 100 across from the Echo Lake Inn. Ride south on Route 100. The road has narrow shoulders, and winds through a residential area that front lakes (from north to south) Echo, Rescue and Pauline that are fed and drained by the upper reaches of the Black River. Turn left where Route 100 south intersects with Route 103 south (3.4 miles) and continue into the town of Ludlow where Route 100 and Route 103 split (5.4 miles). There are several opportunities for restrooms, food, and drink in Ludlow.

Take a break in Ludlow.

Continue through Ludlow, about 2 miles, and beyond on Route 103 south.  Turn left on Route 131 east (8.5 miles). Singleton’s General Store, in Proctorsville, is on the right (8.9 miles). A little bit further (9.0 miles) you will come to Depot St. Two blocks down, on the left, is the Opera House Café & Bakery. Riding on, following Route 131 east, without warning, and for no apparent reason, the town of Proctorsville suddenly becomes the town of Cavendish. Be sure to keep an eye out on your left for Twenty Mile Stream Road (9.3 miles) It’s the longest street sign in Vermont.

20 Mile Stream Loop MapTurn left on 20 Mile Stream Rd (9.3 miles), it’a paved road with no marked shoulders, but little traffic. It begins as a bit of a climb and then goes up and down, mostly up winding through a haphazard mix of residences before it opens up through a meadow filled valley. Typical of a Vermont bike ride, it just feels good to ride through it.

Visit Happy Acres Farm.

The pavement on this Vermont bike ride ends (13 miles), turns to hard-pack dirt and steadily increases in pitch until it intersects with the Tyson/Reading Road (16.3 miles).Turn left on Tyson/Reading Road, and slip into the big ring. With the exception of one small up and down section by Colby Pond, the rest of the ride is a peddle free downhill ride on a winding paved road (no marked shoulders but little traffic) through shaded forest and open meadow until you reach the end of this loop a the junction with Route 100 (19.3 miles).