A Vermont local along the CCC Road.

A Vermont local along the CCC Road.

Discovering Vermont is an adventure.  And travelling the back roads without a map is best.  Here at the October Country Inn, we love back road travel whether it be by car, bike, or on foot.  We often sit around after breakfast discussing the day’s sightseeing options.  One option is to check out the nearby CCC Road.  The Civilian Conservation Corps built it.

Built as part of the New Deal.

Remains of an old CCC shelter at the trailhead to the Shrewsbury Peak trail.

Remains of an old CCC shelter at the trailhead to the Shrewsbury Peak trail.

After the stock market crash of 1929, a drastic economic depression followed.  President Franklin Delano Roosevelt formed the CCC to provide employment.  Called “Roosevelt’s Forest Army,”  he employed over 3 million needy young men. They were provided shelter, 3 meals a day, some education, and new skills.   These men carryied out forest conservation projects in thousands of camps all around the country.  The CCC Road was one such project.  Built in the early 1930s, it joined the CCC camps  in Plymouth and Shrewsbury.

The road is closed during Winter.

ccc road mapThis road, closed during the winter months, is roughly six miles of decent hard-packed dirt that runs from Route 100 just south of Woodward Lake in neighboring Plymouth, across the Plymsbury Plateau and ending in North Shrewsbury where it’s a short trip to Rutland and points west.

There are several hiking trailheads.

Although you can stop anywhere along the road and pull off, there are several places you can get out to walk and explore. At one mile is Tinker Brook State Natural Area. Access is on the south side at a curve in the road (there is no sign, only a small pull off for parking). A short walk in takes you to the hiking shelter.  At 2.0 miles (one mile east of Tinker Brook) is the east access to Shrewsbury Peak.  At 2.9 miles (1.9 miles east of the east Shrewsbury Peak access) is a gated access on the north side of the road. On the south side of the road is a small pull-off and access into the Plymouth Wildlife Management Area.